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Making changes in your life can be hard. When talking to friends and reading self help books isn’t enough, then it’s time to make an appointment with a therapist. Below are some of my areas of specialization. If one of these specialities speaks to you, then give me a call

My areas of expertise

Here are descriptions of what I do well. I have a lot of experience and training in using these therapies. If they sound right for you, let’s work together to heal your pain. Contact me to get started.

Financial problems seriously affect individuals and their families.  The problems that individuals face with uncertain finances are compounded when considering their effects on families.  Parents and their children are stuck in unspoken worry and anger about the inability to live in their house or apartments, have cars, or even maintain their accustomed meals.  Questions from children to parents are frequently met with silence or anger.  In time, parental and children relationships could end up in fights.  Then, marital relationships end up in arguments in which there are threats of separation of divorce.  Financial problems are one of the leading causes of divorce.

Our approach combines financial literacy and psychotherapy.  By altering the emotional response to financial decision-making, it reduces unwise finances choices.  It uses the transtheoretical model that reduces impulsiveness. By reducing impulsive behavior, people can regain responsible personal finance. 

For more information about how to take control of your finances, check out “More than Numbers: Everyday Financial Therapy“.

Families are frequently called the bedrock of a society.  Families can have many shapes.  They form over time as the responses to crises that families face.  These shapes are unique as the complex problems that exist in today’s complex world.  Children grow into adults; sometimes, they receive enough guidance from their parents.  And sometimes, children are ill-prepared as they venture into the hurried existence as adults.  What is certain is that family problems can create problems that cannot be easily solved.

We welcome all family members to be part of the therapy process.  Our goal is to get buy-in by understanding what everyone brings to the table.  We start by believing that family members fighting each other may be a good sign!  We try to channel people’s energy to create meaningful change and resolution of the deep-seated conflicts.  We help families create rules and rituals that will help them navigate stressors in today’s world.  We challenge families to work together in working toward change. 

Traditionally, families consisted of parents and their children. Today, adults and their children may not be married. Or there may be blended families with parents from multiple relationships cohabiting with their respective children. Or there may just be single parents who don’t live with their partners.

It really doesn’t matter on who constitutes a family, disputes among adults create a lot of trouble for their relationships. To heal a marriage, it’s not surprising that couples want to improve their communication.

We start by educating couples about how to effectively communicate their needs, hurts, and dreams. We challenge couples to remember the reasons that they joined them together. We work with couples to build on what they are doing right. Finally, we work with couples to dream about their future together.

We are practical and use common sense strategies in helping couples. Whether with compliments or challenges, we celebrate the joy that brought couples together.

Addictions are endemic and affect everyone in one way or another. My guess is that addictions have affected you and your family. For the most part, addictions fall on a use, abuse, and dependency continuum.. Not everyone experiences the same problems from their addictions.

They are associated with risky, life-threatening behavior, alienation from friends and families, uncontrolled behavior and death. The most recent psychiatric textbooks include addictions such gambling, paraphilia (i.e., uncommon sexual behaviors), alcoholism, and legal and illegal drug use. Even repetitive violent behavior and fire setting can be habitual and compulsive and resemble addictions.

There is no one therapy that addresses all behavior and substance use addictions. Just about every therapy model has been tried to cure addictions. Because addictions affect families, family therapy is often necessary. Because addictions consist of compulsive body-soul-mind interactions, no one model can do it all. Because not everyone is the same, our approach is to start with your needs and work outwards. In the end, it’ll mean working together one step at a time.

We treat the impulsiveness in a hurried, electronic world that has resulted in compulsive behavior in social media, gaming, and viewing pornography.

These habits have greatly reduced one to one communication with families and friends. These addictive electronic activities pose serious psychiatric challenges.

Our approach is to combine two therapies: cognitive behavioral therapy with mindfulness. By combining self-talk and positive affirmation with the reduction of reactive behavior, people become less impulsive and lessen their compulsive lifestyle. By adopting a reflective lifestyle, relationships are deepened and conflict is lessened.

Depression is the common cold that can develop into pneumonia.  Most people know someone who is depressed.  People who are depressed feel a lot of guilt and worthlessness. 

What makes depression painful is that each day starts and ends without much purpose or joy.  It’s not surprising that people with depression have a hard time eating and sleeping.  People who are depressed are also lethargic and can’t concentrate on getting things done. 

What makes depression dangerous is that there doesn’t seem much purpose in life.  And that’s why getting depressed shouldn’t be taken lightly.  It’s not just a matter of telling someone to get up and do something.  If they could, they would.  To feel better, a person will need to change their thinking and feelings.

To best treat depression, psychiatric medication should sometimes be considered. However, some form of therapy is always essential. There are no cookie-cutter solutions to complex problems like depression. We believe that a mixture of therapies will be necessary to meet the needs of each person.

Anxiety is another common problem. At some time, everyone gets anxious. And most of the time, everyone can handle their anxiety. But when anxiety gets out of control, it can take the form of panic attacks.

What makes them scary is that they can occur without warning. When anxiety attacks make people unable to work or have a social life, they need to be stopped. When it gets really bad, people have frequent panic attacks . They feel like a heart attack. Sweating, trembling or shaking, sensations of shortness of breath or smothering, feelings of choking, and chest pain or discomfort, and nausea are common signs.

Feeling dizzy, unsteady, light-headed, or faint. chills or heat sensations, paresthesia (numbness or tingling sensations) are also common. Finally, derealization (feelings of unreality) or depersonalization (being detached from oneself). fear of losing control “going crazy, ” and fear of dying are truly terrifying experiences of an anxiety attack.

Anxiety and panic attacks can be reduced such as relaxation exercises, changes in thinking, changes in behavioral patterns and techniques like mindfulness.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy has been widely used to treat severe personality disorders. These are ingrained lifelong problems that are self-destructive especially in terms of relationships with friends and families. One key impediment is that emotions are unsteady and makes life miserable for everyone. The unsteady emotions go from being dangerously giddy to being depressed to the point of suicide. Dialectical Behavior helps people manage their mood shifts and go about life in a productive manner.

Financial problems seriously affect individuals and their families.  The problems that individuals face with uncertain finances are compounded when considering their effects on families.  Parents and their children are stuck in unspoken worry and anger about the inability to live in their house or apartments, have cars, or even maintain their accustomed meals.  Questions from children to parents are frequently met with silence or anger.  In time, parental and children relationships could end up in fights.  Then, marital relationships end up in arguments in which there are threats of separation of divorce.  Financial problems are one of the leading causes of marital divorce!

Our approach combines financial literacy and psychotherapy.  By altering the emotional response to financial decision-making, it reduces unwise finances choices.  It uses the transtheoretical model that reduces impulsiveness.  Based on an addictions  model, personal finance becomes substance use behavior.   By reducing compulsive behavior, people can regain responsible personal finance.  Read our research on financial therapy.

For more information about how to take control of your finances, check out “More than Numbers: Everyday Financial Therapy“.

Families are frequently called the bedrock of a society.  Families can have many shapes.  They form over time as the responses to crises that families face.  These shapes are unique as the complex problems that exist in today’s complex world.  Children grow into adults; sometimes, they receive enough guidance from their parents.  And sometimes, children are ill-prepared as they venture into the hurried existence as adults.  What is certain is that family problems can create problems that cannot be easily solved.

We welcome all family members to be part of the therapy process.  Our goal is to get buy-in by understanding what everyone brings to the table.  We start by believing that family members fighting each other may be a good sign!  We try to channel people’s energy to create meaningful change and resolution of the deep-seated conflicts.  We help families create rules and rituals that will help them navigate stressors in today’s world.  We challenge families to work together in working toward change. 

Traditionally, families were built on intimate marital relationships and their children.  But today, within families, adults may not be married.  Or there may be blended families with parents from multiple relationships cohabiting with their respective children.  Or there may just be single parents with their non cohabiting partners.  It doesn’t really matter what type of family configuration:  disputes among the adults create a lot of trouble for the children in the household.  The children frequently are called upon to take sides among the warring adults/parents.  When children are caught in the middle of any conflict among parents, the family itself is the victim.  Marital relationships with children as the pawns that undermine a family.  And the family generally doesn’t survive that type of battle.

A common complaint that we hear from couples is that they want to improve their communication.  We start by educating couples about how to effectively communicate their needs, hurts, and dreams.  We challenge couples to remember the reasons that they joined them together.  We work with couples to build on what they are doing that are productive.  Finally, we work with couples to dream about their future together.  We are practical and use common sense strategies throughout therapy sessions.  Whether compliment or challenge, we celebrate the joy that brought them together.

Addictions are endemic and affect everyone in one way or another.   Chances are that addictions have affected you or your family.  Addictions include both the behavioral and substance use variety.  For the most part, addictions fall on a spectrum from use, abuse, and dependency as falling on a continuum.   However, the problem with this definition is that not everyone experiences the same problems from their addictions.  Addictions are often associated with risky, life-threatening behavior, alienation from friends and families, uncontrolled behavior and death.  The most recent psychiatric textbooks include addictions such as gambling, paraphilia (uncommon sexual behaviors), alcoholism, and legal and illegal drug use.  Even repetitive violent behavior and fire setting can be habitual and compulsive and seen like addictions.

There is no one therapy that addresses behavior and substance use addictions.  It includes every therapy model that exists!  Because they consist of compulsive behavior that body-soul-mind interaction, no one model can effectively address all of its symptoms.  Addictions therapy involves everyone within a family and so one person’s mind-body-soul interactions and family therapy are included in our treatment approach.  Read some of our research in addictions.

Impulsiveness is a by-product of a hurried, electronic world where social media is a psychiatric danger. Social network use has greatly increased the amount of time that children and adolescents spend in front of computer screens.  This has led to the reduction of intense interpersonal communication within families and in a wide social environment. Although social networks allow communication with a large number of people, these interactions can be shallow and cannot adequately replace everyday face-to-face interactions.  Depression is one outcome that is commonly seen.  Comparisons in physical appearance, honesty, and intelligence can lead to lowered self-esteem.  Finally, people, especially teenagers can become unable to control their emotional reactions to everyday circumstances.

Depression is the common cold that can develop into pneumonia.  Most people know someone who is depressed.  People who are depressed feel a lot of guilt and worthlessness.  What makes depression painful is that each day starts and ends without much purpose or joy.   It’s not surprising that people with depression have a hard time eating and sleeping.  People who are depressed are also lethargic and can’t concentrate on getting things done.  What makes depression dangerous is that there doesn’t seem much purpose in life.  And that’s why getting depressed shouldn’t be taken lightly.  It’s not just a matter of telling someone to get up and do something.  If they could, they would.  To feel better, a person will need to change their thinking and feelings.

Anxiety is another common problem.  At some time, everyone gets anxious.  And most of the time, everyone can handle their anxiety.  But when anxiety gets out of control, there are signs of anxiety that can take the form of panic attacks.  What makes it scary is that they can occur without warning.  When anxiety attacks make people unable to work or have a social life, then they need to be stopped.  When it gets really bad, people have panic attacks all the time.  They feel like a heart attack.  Sweating, trembling or shaking, sensations of shortness of breath or smothering, feelings of choking, and chest pain or discomfort, and nausea are common signs..  Feeling dizzy, unsteady, light-headed, or faint. chills or heat sensations, paresthesia (numbness or tingling sensations) are also common.  Finally, derealization (feelings of unreality) or depersonalization (being detached from oneself). fear of losing control “going crazy, ” and fear of dying are truly terrifying experiences of an anxiety attack.  What works to reduce anxiety and panic attacks are relaxation exercises, changes in thinking, behavioral patterns, and emotion, and techniques like mindfulness.

People solve problems by changing their thoughts, emotions, and behavior.  Two therapy models–Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy–are widely used to help people.  By changing how thoughts, emotions, and behaviors work together, people’s problems are improved.  Dialectical Behavior Therapy adds mindfulness to Cognitive Behavior Therapy.  It decreases impulsiveness and allows self-regulation.